Missional Field Notes

Quotes, Examples, and Ideas from My Missional Frontier

Disciple-making is more about imitation than it is about information.

Jesus is more interested in what we do in practice than in what we absorb in the abstract. Which isn’t to say that Christian education is wrong, it’s just that’s not the end goal. The reason we study is in order that we might build our lives more firmly on the rock that is Jesus – by putting into practice what we hear him say.

So Jesus calls us to a lifestyle of discipleship, whereby we are constantly growing as Jesus-imitators.

This is the foundation for how the church is to grow, because mission, at its core essence, is about inviting people into a discipling relationship with Jesus.

(Via The Fellowship Community)

December 16, 2016

From The Missional Canuck

A church where the mission is not the first organizing principle of the church’s life will eventually cease to be the church. As Barth has often been quoted “The church’s mission is not secondary to its being; the church exists in being sent and in building itself for its mission.” The missional church is not primarily about having a mission or doing mission, it is about how the church is constituted. All that the church does must be able to point back to it’s relevance to the mission of God.

November 27, 2016

Scripture is a crosscultural book. It was written in cross-cultural contexts. Its full of cross-cultural encounters. It assumes cross-cultural movements. It ends with cross-cultural worship.

(Via Chris Woznicki)

November 19, 2016

If there’s something in God’s kingdom that you’ve looked at and thought “I could never do that because…,” would you stop for a minute, and try seriously asking God if maybe that thing you think you can’t do is actually something he’s made you to do?

 

(via)

November 2, 2016

Another quote from a meeting of the General Board of Global Ministries. The picture was posted by my Superintendent, Carlo Rapanut, who is attending the meeting. This quote gets us beyond the “paternalism” that is often associated with mission work and a missional focus — where the “haves” minister to the “have nots.” And, it’s …

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