Missional Field Notes

Quotes, Examples, and Ideas from My Missional Frontier

From Ben Connelly: Jesus probably wasn’t born on December 25, and God didn’t invent Halloween or Thanksgiving. But these and other annual days have been carved into our culture, to cease work, celebrate, and engage others. Gifts abound in December, giving us an easy chance to surprise coworkers and classmates with cookies or a brief …

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Neighborhood Rather than Church

Karina Kreminski

Once we make the shift from asking “What is God doing in my church?” to “What is God doing in my neighborhood?” radical change occurs in thinking about our purpose as God’s community on earth. This does not mean that we ignore the church, or that we stop investing in the church. Instead, we see the church as one very important part of the neighborhood ecosystem. We renounce the dualism that says sacred spaces exist in the church but not in our community, workplace and public places.  Rather than focusing on creeds, information and conferences as helpful as those things are, we refuse to endorse a disembodied faith that fails to put into practice what we believe. More and more I see churches that are taking seriously a theology of the neighborhood.

December 8, 2016

This I hadn’t really thought of before. Most of the missional conversation involves “going out.” We’re getting the people out of the church into the community. We’re engaged in service projects. We’re trying to meet people where they are. It all seems so very basic. But what if, for some reason, you can’t really “get …

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“Exegeting the neighborhood” This is a term that has come up time and time again, here and from other missional writers. The long and short of it is that “place” is important. It’s important to understand where it is that you are sent (which is often where you already are!). We need to have a …

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This is actually very similar to an idea I had for a church down in Hattiesburg, Mississippi about 10 years ago. That particular church was located in a poorer neighborhood and the price of some of the run-down homes was dirt cheap. I wondered, with the pastor, what it would look like to purchase a …

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I believe the future of the church is a rooted one; one that submerges itself in community, in neighborhoods, and in focused faithfulness. The recovery of a rooted church will collide with real leaders, trained in real “success” strategies that have formed real personal images of being significant. Everything about rootedness will collide with our …

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