Missional Field Notes

Quotes, Examples, and Ideas from My Missional Frontier

We exist to share the good news, and tangibly displaying God’s love is an important part of how we do that. We do this because we are imitating Jesus, who as he preached also healed the sick and fed the hungry as signs of a Kingdom that is not of this world. As N.T. Wright puts it, our acts of service and mercy “sketch out with pencil what Jesus will one day paint over in indelible ink.” As the body of Christ, we are helping people see God. They should be able to look at us and glimpse—however faintly—aspects of God’s character.

(via)

July 2, 2015

In Surprised by Hope, [N.T.] Wright (who argues persuasively and in scholarly depth for a literal, historical, bodily resurrection of Jesus) asserts that the bodily resurrection when clearly understood leads inexorably to the church’s mission. Indeed, the mission of the church is to implement the victory Christ won on the cross and revealed in the …

Continue reading

We want peace in the world, but we believers are at war w/ one another. Jesus convert us from sons/daughters of thunder to loving disciples. — Marlena Graves (@MarlenaGraves) August 29, 2014 ********* D.C. adds a social worker to library system to work with homeless patrons http://t.co/xKSKdjiG2B via @washingtonpost — Love Wins Ministries (@lovewins) August …

Continue reading

The various atonement theories are like Midrash on the significance of the cross. — trippfuller (@trippfuller) May 2, 2014 ******** Privilege says that the largest ministry with the most resources is the most effective ministry. http://t.co/4qCRgFJcoP — Missio Alliance (@missioalliance) May 2, 2014 ******* "The vocation of the church is to be in prayer over …

Continue reading

We’re looking at the Missio Dei through the Scriptures over a seven-week sermon series at Seward and Moose Pass UMCs. Last week we focused on the Exile and what it means to be “displaced” persons singing God’s song in a foreign land. Next week we move on to Incarnation as the great act of God’s …

Continue reading

From Johnathan Storment in a guest post at Patheos: [N.T.] Wright starts his epic 2,000 page book [on Paul] in a surprising place. He starts in the book of Philemon. Because, Wright says that, if Theology matters, then it has to be local. It must not be abstract.  So he starts talking about this man …

Continue reading