Missional Field Notes

Quotes, Examples, and Ideas from My Missional Frontier

There is talk in the United Methodist Church about the role of the local church. We are connectional, connected to each other, bound by a Book of Discipline. But, some argue, what would it look like if we could make that Book smaller and give some more autonomy to geographical areas of churches (conferences). Bishop Bruce R. Ough of the Dakota-Minnesota Episcopal Area talks about the importance of the local church for the future mission and ministry of the church.

 

Why? Because local churches, with their multiple, diverse and entrepreneurial avenues of outreach can efficiently go to the people in the streets, the workplaces and our communities to offer the hope, healing and saving grace of Jesus. People worship God in local churches. People profess their faith in local churches. People engage in true Wesleyan holy conferencing in local churches. People are equipped and sent as witnesses through local churches. Local churches call forth and develop leaders. Local churches create new places for new people. Local churches are in ministry with the poor. Local churches bring healing to the world.

But, perhaps even more significantly, local churches are innovators. They can go to the edges of the connection and expand its reach and impact. They can move into the shadows where people are forgotten or forced to hide. They can go into the stress fractures that arise from our divisions and bind up the wounds. They can facilitate people seeing Christ in the “other.” They can give expression to orthodoxy through unorthodox methods. They can address unresolved matters by building relationships. They can spread scriptural holiness into the nooks and crannies, the highways and byways of cultures throughout the world. They can recover the vitality and power of a truly spiritual and practical “connection.” The innovative and adaptive energy of our local churches will likely determine the extent and impact of our Methodist revival movement in the 21st century.

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