Missional Field Notes

Quotes, Examples, and Ideas from My Missional Frontier

zahnd

On Thursday I’ll be attending an online learning event to hear from Brian Zahnd. Brian is pastor at Word of Life Church in St. Joseph, MO. I’ve been reading about him (no so much reading “him” for a while. His name has come up. And, when the learning event was offered through Ecclesia, I signed on and have been browsing some Brian Zahnd material. I thought for the next couple of days I’d highlight some of his writing and offer a brief comment.

The following is from an awesome blog post entitled: My Problem With the Bible:

When Jesus said, “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth,” how was that received? Well, it depends on who is hearing it. The poor Galilean peasant would hear it as good news (gospel), while the Roman in his villa would hear it with deep suspicion. (I know it’s an anachronism, but I can imagine Claudius saying something like, “sounds like socialism to me!”)

And that’s the challenge I face in reading the Bible. I’m not the Galilean peasant. Who am I kidding! I’m the Roman in his villa and I need to be honest about it. I too can hear the gospel of the kingdom as good news (because it is!), but first I need to admit its radical nature and not try to tame it to endorse my inherited entitlement.

I am a (relatively) wealthy white American male. Which is fine, but it means I have to work hard at reading the Bible right. I have to see myself basically as aligned with Pharaoh, Nebuchadnezzar, and Caesar. In that case, what does the Bible ask of me? Voluntary poverty? Not necessarily. But certainly the Bible calls me to deep humility — a humility demonstrated in hospitality and generosity. There’s nothing necessarily wrong with being a relatively well-off white American male, but I better be humble, hospitable, and generous!

If I read the Bible with the appropriate perspective and humility I don’t use the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus as a proof-text to condemn others to hell. I use it as a reminder that I’m a rich man and Lazarus lies at my door. I don’t use the conquest narratives of Joshua to justify Manifest Destiny. Instead I see myself as a Rahab who needs to welcome newcomers. I don’t fancy myself as Elijah calling down fire from heaven. I’m more like Nebuchadnezzar who needs to humble himself lest he go insane.

I, too, have the same problem reading the Bible. And, frankly, most of the persons in the churches I’ve served have that problem as well. And it can be so hard to overcome this.

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